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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)
tonight, and to hear from governor romney and hear what we expect will be and what the crowd looks like is expecting a concession speech. i'm sorry, judy, back to you. >> woodruff: no, that's fine. we can stay on the pictures. i think people may be more interested in looking at the pictures than me talking. yeah, there's chicago. we may alternate back and forth as we wait to find out what's going on, and when if the president is going to speak, when and if governor romney is going to have something to say. again on the same-sex marriage, you were all making the point it has not passed anywhere before. it's been defeated. richard norton smith, i mean, the united states has come a very long way, hasn't it othis issue? >> you know, it has. it's only been what, a little more than a decade since the state of vermont during howard dean's governorship embraced the concept, then radical-- certainly politically risky-- of civicivilians. it's a social movement that that has accelerated at a pace few would have predicted in the late 90s. it's fascinating to speculate as to the future. it's one of
obama and governor romney have spent the day drumming up last-minute support in battleground states. >> you may be frustrated at the pace of change. i promise you, so am i sometimes. but you know that i say what i mean and i mean what i say. (cheers and applause) i said i'd tend war in iraq and i ended it. i said i'd pass health care reform. i passed it. (cheers and applause) i said i'd repeal "don't ask, don't tell." we repealed it. (cheers and applause) i said we'd crack down on reckless practices on wall street and we did. (applause) so you know where i stand. you know what i believe. you know i tell the truth. and you know that i'll fight for you and your families every single day as hard as i know how. you know that about me. (cheers and applause) >> you see, talk is cheap but a record, that's real and it's earned with real effort. (cheers and applause) i mean, the president promised a lot of change, but change can't be measured in speeches, it has to be measured in achievements and four years ago candidate obama promised to do oh so very much but he's fallen oh so very short.
how barack obama and mitt romney plan to fix some of america's most serious problems. the stakes could not be much higher. nearly five years after the start of the great recession, more than 20 million americans are unemployed or under-employed. the national debt has soared 16 trillion dollars. and our ability to fund medicare is in doubt. tens of millions of americans still don't have medical insurance. and the nation faces challenges around the world -- from the middle east to china. later in the broadcast jeffrey brown of the pbs newshour will look at some critical issues all but been ignored during the campaign. frontline will examine key moments that shaped both candidates' lives when they were young men. political journalists and authors will join gwen ifill on the "washington week" set to discuss how the presidency has transformed many of the men who have won it. and jeff greenfield of "need to know" will weigh in on this question: how can we predict which candidates will become successful presidents? but we begin with a look at the most pressing problems facing the nation today
counted, but winning ohio gave the president enough electoral college votes for victory. governor romney, the former governor of massachusetts, conceded just after 1:00 a.m. >> and i ran for office because i'm concerned about america. this election is over but our principles endure. that i believe the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurgent economy and to renewed greatness. like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the ield we have given all our to this campaign. (cheers and applause) i so wish -- i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. but the nation chose another leader so ann and i join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation. >> rose: the race revealed america's shifting fault lines. it was a national conversation carried out in a few battleground states. billions of dollars poured into theampan as both sides sought to define the other as responsible for the country's economic and partisan gridlock. but when it became clear that the long race had
news. >>hio is still the granddaddy of them all. governor romney's going there the most of all the battleground state, the same with the president. right now you would have to say that the president has the better electoral map, the polls in more battleground states are favouring him. but romney is doing better in north carolina and florida, and on the early vote he's doing well in those states, doing well in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this qstio what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider theook toy is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that
an obama and a boehner and a romney or a reid together with a relatively small number of people you could exercise serious presidential leadership even with all the other things going on in the country. >> tom and then jon. go ahead, tom. >> i'll just add to david's point. when jon meacham 20 years from now writes the biography of president obama and the first term there will surely be a chapter titled "how could bit that barack obama turned out to be the worst communicating president in american history?" i think that's been -- he himself has acknowledged he had no narrative. and i think part of it was that he was reacting to the hillary criticism, oh, he just gives speeches. part of it he was truly focused on the substance of what he did i would argue it was not all just this noise thg. i think they had a very bad communications strategy. there's a way of getting things across and repeating things. a way of explaining things like health care, a way of explaining the importance of race to the top in this year of globalization, a way of explaining the amazing deals he put through and i th
it or not, six, average income of $202 million paid nothing. they were members of romney's 47%. i mean -- and i suspect he got their vote. but just a bunch of moochers. just a bunch of moochers. >> rose: they voted for him, did they? (laughs) >> but they're -- well, we've conducted a survey three times in my office in three different years and the office has between 16 and probably 21 employees during that period and each time my tax rate was considerably lower-- i'm talking about payroll taxes plus income taxes-- considerably lower than anybody else in the office. these people made various incomes. and the tax law in many cases is not progressive. i think the tax law should be progressive. i think that when people make $15 or $20 million or $200 million and pay a 10% rate i think something should be done about that. >> rose: then people step forward and say well, that's because most of the income comes from dividends which is taxed at a lower rate. >> they would probably say most of it comes from capital gains and it taxed at a lower rate. >> rose: i mean capital gains. >> this just m
, but i think they are much happy that mr. obama beat out mr. romney. >> rose: you have a point there, based on what mr. romney said he would do in the first day. richard mcgregor, financial times, ian bremmer, you're eurasia group, stay with us, we will be right back. >> rose: sir and they have told tolstoy's anna karenina into a film, one against directed by jim wright and the movie find new ways to tell a love story that is familiar to all of us. here is the trailer for the film. ♪ >> i got married but it was not love. we must all cherish him for russia's sake. >> romantic love is the last illusion of the old order. >> he is a rich, good-looking cavalry officer. >> i must warn you about something. >> warn me? >> you may find indiscretion, give the world a reason to talk about you. >> if you have any shortcoming you will give me back my peace. >> will will be no peace for us, only misery. there will be no peace for us. >> we are bound together by god and can only be prone by a crime against god. >> it is not something, it is everything. >> you will destroy yourself. >> it is the m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)